Sunday, April 4, 2010

Cherokee Indian Art Market



In our fast paced world it is difficult for many people to find the time or the interest to stop and read anything much longer than a one-liner Facebook update, so I am thanking all my blogging friends for having come to my blog this past year and taking time to read and comment on my posts. I appreciate it very much.

Spring has arrived. Below is a tree full of flowering buds in a street not far from our home. We had a dogwood tree but last year a large pine tree fell on it during a violent storm.




Last July we visited the Cherokee Indian Reservation and I wrote four posts on our stay there – see Staying at the Cherokee Indian Reservation, Oconaluftee Mountain Farm Museum, In and Around the Cherokee Indian Reservation in North Carolina and Bears on the Cherokee Reservation.



The Cherokee Indian Reservation is located in the Smoky Mountains of North Carolina, about 3 hours from Atlanta, Georgia. This Reservation of 56,000 acres is called the Qualla Boundary. In 1735 the Cherokee Nation inhabited 64 towns and villages on 140,000 square miles. Now it is home to more than 13,000 members of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. The capital, Cherokee, has many special events, motels, hotels, restaurants, a casino, a museum, a historical village, shops, a theater, outdoor sports and fishing tournaments in the Cherokee Tribal fishing waters. The Oconaluftee River passes through downtown Cherokee. We walked on the park bordering the river and watched fishermen and people wading in the water.


Click on the pictures to enlarge them

Walking on moss under a canopy of oak and sycamore we came upon a path lined with tall bamboos. Once surrounded by these tall bamboo branches it was very quiet and dark; the outside world seemed to disappear - apart from a couple of Red Headed ducks.




Then we drove toward the center of town and parked. We could hear some peeping and looking up saw a small birds nest on top a flood light. Do you know what kind of birds these are?




The Cherokee Indian Art Market was in progress with more than fifty nationally recognized, juried craftspeople and artisans from around the country. This is one of the southeast‘s largest Native American art markets. The arts and crafts on display included some traditional pottery, wood and stone carvings, jewelry, paintings and more. The event was under a large tent.



Below are beautiful baskets –


Knives, pottery, sculpture and beaded work –



The gentleman below won first prize in its category for his triple flute handcrafted of cedar, butternut and walnut. It is inlaid with malachite and copper. He gave us a demonstration – the flute was beautiful and really had a sweet sound.



Many pieces of art made by Native People were for sale –

Click on images to enlarge them


The type of clothing below is what the Cherokee Indians wore after they had contact with European pioneer immigrants.



Outside the tent we met a Cherokee dressed in traditional regalia dating from before they met the first Europeans.



I met the Junior Miss Choctaw, from Oklahoma,



and the Miss Cherokee. They graciously agreed to pose for me.



Some handsome Cherokee Indians were walking by; they also let me take their pictures.



There were plenty of interesting things going on for me to capture with my camera. Story tellers had group of children gaping at their accoutrements and displays.


Don't forget to click on the pictures to enlarge them

Native Americans and non-natives were strolling in and out of the market, waiting for the Totonac Pole Flyers.




It was quite warm, so we decided to go by the river and rest. That gave me time to read all about the Totonac Pole Flyers. I’ll tell you about them in my next post.


54 comments:

wenn said...

wow, admire those lovely unique photos!

Val said...

that is so interesting - i would have loved to go to that market; i think those birds are some kind of Martin?
or swift? loved the bamboo forest too!! thank you

Kenza said...

Bonjour Vagabonde,
Je te souhaite de joyeuses fêtes de Pâques, beaucoup de chocolats, des rires et de la joie!!
Merci pour ce très beau sujet, grâce à toi je voyage dans des contrées magnifiques...
Bisous chocolatés

Bonnie, Original Art Studio said...

Oh my - what talented, handsome, amazing people! The superior craftmanship of their products is evident in your photographs.

Loved, loved your shots of that shaded bamboo path - made me long to walk it!

Lovely post Vagabonde.

Carolyn said...

Thank you for taking us with you on your journey....it was wonderful and your photos are splendid. Have a wonderful weekend.
Smiles

DJan said...

Yes, spring is definitely here, by the looks of that beautiful tree. I have no idea what those birds are, they are not around here. I also was amazed at the bamboo forest and your description of it. We have Indians in this part of the country, too, the Coast Salish. They seem very different from the Cherokee. Thank you for the wonderful article! Oh, and Happy Easter to you, VB!

Kay Dennison said...

What a wonderful trip!!!! It's one of the things that's on my list of places I'd like to visit. How I envy you.

Fennie said...

Quite incredible! I am bowled over. Such beauty - both natural and man-made. And so close to Atlanta. Thank you for another really super post, Vagabonde. I'd be interested to hear something about the Native American languages if you are ever posting on that subject.

JM said...

I'm very fond of Native American cultures so it's no big deal if I tell you I would love to hang out in that market. Wonderful outfits and handicrafts in your shots! Also find the bamboo and last shot absolutely lovely.

Alaine said...

Vagabonde, thanks for taking us there; most interesting. I love the colourful mocassins in the first pic and the bamboo forest is amazing. I think those little birds may be swallows.

RennyBA's Terella said...

What a readable and well documenter post about these native people.
You know I love stories like that and the fact that their culture and traditions slowly are taken care of and appreciated.

Happy Easter Holidays! So did you got any Bunny Eggs? - like we find them in the forest in Norway (seen in my last post)?

Vicki Lane said...

A fine post, Vagabonde. I love visiting Cherokee (part of my third book OLD WOUNDS is set there) and this makes me want to go back soon.

Louis la Vache said...

Your posts are so richly detailed and interesting!

Mme la Vache et «Louis» wish you a blessed Easter.

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

What a wonder post!! Thanks you so much for telling me about it and I look forward to the follow-ups and will go and read the previous posts too.

How great to see their original dress and all those beautiful crafts. They have so much talent. Like Jose, I could easily spend a whole day there myself as there is so much of interest. I especially love that carving of the bear.

young-ecletic-encounters said...

Wow just found your blog what a wonderful detailed post and such amazing photos and collages, so very well done. I shall come again for another delightful visit.

Fennie said...

Thanks so much, Vagabonde, for the reference to your 'Bears' post. Most interesting - though I am disconcerted to find that I could not write my name in the Cherokee language. They don't seem to have a letter for 'F,' which is most strange.

yves1947 said...

Bonjour Vagabonde.
C'est toujours un plaisir de regarder tes magnifiques photos et de lire les explications pertinentes qui nous permettre de compléter nos connaissances.
Je te souhaite un très agréable lundi de Pâques et une bonne semaine.
******bisousssssssss*****
Yvzs

BJM said...

I like the strong colours in the beadwork. B.

Unseen Rajasthan said...

This is a lovely post with beautiful stuff !! Nice information !!Unseen Rajasthan

Paty said...

hi! happy Easter!!
it´s so nice to read about indians; it seems to me that in the USA they are in better conditions than here in Brazil. I wish I could visit them in the USA sometime. Their baskets are so similar to the ones our indians do... in fact, i have some of them in my house, which I bought when me and my husband worked with them 5 years ago.
I´m interested about they´re language too, as someone said above...
Have a nice week!

Ginnie said...

I am very familiar with Cherokee, Vagabonde...the city, the area and the people! I have had two partners in past lives who are part Cherokee, so I made sure our house was full of Native-American art. It's very soulful to me. Thanks for presenting these First-Nation people (as the Canadians would say) so beautifully to us. I have often said I think I was a 'brave' in a past life. :)

Baino said...

What a day. I love the colourful shoes, they'd make exceptional slippers! So cool that they maintain their crafts and culture and indeed they look extremely proud to do so. I always think it funny to see blonde haired aboriginals! I have a friend who claims to be'part' Cherokee, a white skinned redhead with freckles!Gorgeous photos of course not sure about bamboo! It's a noxious weed here, dreadful stuff to control.

Friko said...

It is so very sad that the Indian nations as nations have al but been wiped out. I know we cannot live in the past but European settlers have done much wrong to these people.
The fact that there are exhibitions and craft markets as such is a good thing, I suppose, but how much better would it be if once proud peoples could still live their own way of life, adapted to modernity.

Kenza said...

Bonsoir Vagabonde,
Une visite tardive pour te proposer un petit jeu qui t'attend au Thé au Jasmin, si tu souhaites jouer bien sûr!
Douce nuit

PS: Mille mercis pour ton délicieux commentaire qui m'a profondément touché!!

Gerald (Hyde DP) said...

Interesting stuff - thanks for visiting my Ackworthborn blog - I don't think my Ackworth village has anything much in common at all with Acworth (no k) Georgia - but who knows there may be some historical connection.

claude said...

Bonjour Vagabonde !
Mon Chéri et moi aimons bien l'art Indien, Nous rapportons quelques petites choses chaque fois que nous allons à SLC. La dernière fois c'était dans un magasin spécial art Indien à Park City.
Malheureusement La plupart des articles étaient fabriqués en Chine.
Lorsque je suis allée pour la première fois à SLC en 1985, les Indiens vivaient librement dans cet état de Utah. Lorsque j'y suis retournée avec mon Chéri en 1996, ils étaient en réserve.
Je pense que les oiseaux sont des hirondelles.

Pamela said...

Dear Vagabonde: How would'nt I take the time to read through your whole posts long as they would be! I learn so much with you!
Those birds are so cute, but no idea of what they could be. I really enjoyed this post. Waiting for the next to learn about the Totonac Pole Flyers,

thanks a lot!

Peter said...

I really appreciate the way you make your complete and so well documented posts!

Ruth said...

The colors, faces, smiles, crafts - these are very moving. And look at the clear water.

You did a beautiful job.

dot said...

Another wonderful post! Isn't that a fish trap in the last photo? I enjoyed all of the photos and especially the ones of the bamboo. The pine straw baskets are beautiful. I had a patient once who made them.

Deborah said...

Vagabonde, As I read this and looked at the photos, I was struck by how vibrant this community seems to be. In my part of Canada, native people (they prefer to be called First Nations people up there) do not seem to have this kind of concrete attachment to their history. Or at least, if they do, it is only visible once a year when the Calgary Stampede is on, and of which they are a small part.

The Cherokee community you visited is totally different, from the look of it. Very active, proud of their culture and customs, and the arts and crafts are stunning. Thank you for creating yet another excellent post and giving us a glimpse into a very interesting community.

Deborah said...

And PS I have no idea about the birds, which are lovely! You'll tell us, I'm sure....

My Carolina Kitchen said...

As I read through your post, I felt more and more guilty. We don't live far at all and I hate to admit it, but we've never been there. That has to be corrected soon.
Sam

sablonneuse said...

Belated congratulations on your blog anniversary. Here's wishing you many more years of posting!
Thank you for the fascinating and interesting account of the Cherokee Indian Reservation with beautiful photos.

Reader Wil said...

Chère Vagabonde! Merci de votre poste de l'histoire des Indiens. Je suis toujours intéressée par l'histoire de peuples indigènes. Ma fille cadette habite en Australie et elle s'était mariée avec un aborigine. Maintenant elle est divorcée, mais elle continue à visiter la famille de son ex- mari. Moi, je le fais aussi.

Pam said...

My husband an visited the Cherokee Indian Reservation quite a few years ago. It is in a beautiful area of North Carolina and we learned a lot about the Cherokee Nation.

Jenn Jilks said...

I am so glad that our Aboriginal Nations are once again raising their head, dancing and drumming with joy. I am determined to visit a Pow Wow this year! You have inspired. My husband is working with the library association to bring teaching circles to our town. A valuable educational experience. We have a heavy gr. 6 curriculum component of Native Studies, too. THings are turning around.

Paty said...

Hi! I just read your post about Chopin, I didn´t see it because of my vacation. I´s perfect! I loved the idea you told us about the german word heimat. He know how to use all his talent and sensibility to put it in his music. He´s certainly my favourite composer; i don´t think no one we´ll never create such beautiful melodies as he did.
I took the chance to read other posts of yours while I was out, and I saw you went to a zoo too! very nice posts about your vacation trip.
Have a nice weekend!

WhiteStone said...

My grandmother told me that she was 1/4 Cherokee. Another family member confirmed that but I cannot confirm it anywhere else. Still, I believe what my gramma said was true.

If we make a trip east, I'd love to visit this area. So thanks for the post!

Abraham said...

An absolutely amazing set of photos of these Native Americans. Beautiful people. Great post.

Lori E said...

As someone who is Metis I love to see the culture of the Aboriginal peoples being carried on. In B.C. there are some areas where the elders are the only ones who speak the language original to their people and as they pass on so will their language unless the younger generations learn it and keep it going.
I am glad to hear you liked Vancouver Island. We don't get there as often as we should. It was good for me to look at it as a tourist might see it for a change.

claude said...

Tes jacinthes doivent être des jacinthes d'intérieur.
Tu peux effectivement , soit laisser les bulbes dans le pot actuel ou les replanter dans un autre ou d'autres. Elles repousseront au printemps prochain avec un peu d'arrosage. Ne couper les feuilles que lorsqu'elles sont fanées.

Vagabonde said...

Wenn, Val, Bonnie, Carolyn, Kay Dennison, JM, Alaine, RennyBa, Vicki, Louis la Vache, SAPhotographs, Fennie, BJM and Unseen Rajasthan – Thanks for stopping by. I am pleased you enjoyed the Cherokee Indian Market, it was a lot of fun to attend and fun to talk about.

Vagabonde said...

Kenza, Yves1947, Claude et Reader Wil – je suis contente que le post sur le marché des Chérokees vous a intéressé. Cela était très pittoresque. Merci pour votre visite.

Vagabonde said...

Djan and Deborah – The Cherokees have good PR and they are located in a gorgeous area at the beginning (or the end depending where you come from) of the Blue Ridge Parkway, so they have many vacationers coming by. They have worked hard to keep their community alive and are proud of it. I have seen other Reservations that are not so well organized. Thanks for the comment.

Vagabonde said...

Young-eclectic encounters, Gerald (Hyde HP), White Stone and Lori E – thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a comment. I hope you will come back, you are always welcome.

Vagabonde said...

Paty – Since you worked with the Native People of Brazil, I wish you would do a post about it? Thanks for coming by.

Vagabonde said...

Ginnie, Baino, Friko, Pamela, Peter, Ruth, Sablonneuse, Pam, Jenn Jilks and Abraham - Thank you for your kind words about my post, they mean a lot to me.

Vagabonde said...

Dot – you could be right about the fish trap in the river – I thought the rocks were arranged in a weird way. Thanks for the comment.

Vagabonde said...

My Carolina Kitchen – you really need to visit the Cherokee Indian Reservation since you live close by. Some of my posts show the farm and the mill outside the reservation – they are also very interesting.

Leesa said...

Wow!! I would have LOVED that... I went to an event only once.. it was a big event of different tribes completing but I forgot what the contest was but they were all dressed in their traditional best and it was simply amazing...
Beautiful people! Thanks for sharing this series of photos with us and sharing cultures that I know little about...

Kathryn Stripling Byer said...

Hello, thank you for featuring Cherokee and its people and surroundings. We are only 25 miles away and know the place itself well. One of the best writers I ever had was of Cherokee descent and now teaches in the high school there. Her daughter was Little Miss Cherokee a few years back. Appalachian Heritage featured Cherokee literature in the most recent issue. I have a feature about it on my blog.

Phil said...

Do you know what the large metal regalia items worn around the neck hanging over the chest are called?

Anonymous said...

Phil,

They are called gorgets. They were originally worn by British officers as neck protection, then traded to and among natives. They were common among the eastern tribes. I wear one as part of my regalia as well.

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