Thursday, March 13, 2014

Bulloch Hall 32nd Quilt Show - Ground Floor

Last Tuesday, March 11, 2014, started as a very sunny day.  We were pleased as we had scheduled to go to Roswell, Georgia, to look at the 32nd annual quilt show in Bulloch Hall.  We had been there last year and thoroughly enjoyed our visit.  I wrote three posts on the show, starting with A Quilt Show at Bulloch Hall - Ground Floor on March 18, 2013, then posts here and here.  We bought our tickets in the gift shop and walked to Bulloch Hall which looked gorgeous in the sun with daffodils in bloom around the front lawn.

In addition to the quilt shows we had visited Bulloch Hall before, during the Christmas season in December 2010 and again in 2012.  I wrote posts about each visit.  As I had mentioned then Bulloch Hall, which belongs to the city of Roswell now, was the childhood home of Mittie Bulloch who married Theodore Roosevelt in the dining room of the house in 1853.  Her son Teddy Roosevelt became the 26th president of the United States.  Her other son, Elliott, was the father of Eleanor Roosevelt, the wife of Franklin D. Roosevelt.  The home was built in 1839 on 10 acres of land by Major James Stephens Bulloch, an early settler in Roswell.  Bulloch Hall is the home of the annual Great American Cover-up Quilt Show.  We visited there for more than two hours and when we left it was 78 degrees F outside (25 C.)  It was difficult not to take too many pictures of the antebellum mansion or the quilts.  (Click on collages twice to enlarge.)

This year the exhibit is taking place March 8 through 16, 2014, with more than 200 quilts mostly made by local artists.  Quilts old and new, contemporary and antique are displayed throughout this historic house.  The theme for the 2014 show is "Reflections."  Marie Wood, co-chair of the event said "It could be reflections of the past, reflections of an image in a mirror or water, or simply reflecting angles in a pattern, whatever the personal interpretation."  As we entered the home we were greeted by two large quilts hanging in the front hall.  Quilt no. 1 is called "Kimono" by Ann Quandee.  Ann was there and told us that the kimono pieces had been pieced and appliqued by a friend and given to her for a quilt.  Quilt no. 2 is called "Garden Song" by Carol York.

We wandered around in the front hall and back hall.

At the end of the hall a tall quilt included many flowers.  Its name was "Shine on Mrs. Willie B. Brown" by Elisa Wood.  The brochure stated "The embroidered blocks were made by Mrs. Willie B. Reed Brown of Memphis, Tennessee.  She started hand embroidering the 50 state flowers in the 1950s.  In 2013 she turned 101 years old and her blocks live on.  Peace!"

At the entrance of the exhibit we were given a small slip of paper to write the number of our favorite quilt - an impossible task!  Here is one below I really liked before I even knew what it was called.  It is called "Road Trip" by Wendy Blanton.  She says "Road trip is made of hand-sewn 3" blocks with 70 pieces in each block.  Each block was pieced as my husband and I traveled the roads around our great country."

With such a splendid display of quilts in a great variety of sizes and designs, choosing a favorite will be a very hard task indeed.

I followed my husband into the Warming Room.

The quilt below, no. 21 is "Everything Old is New Again" by Ben Hollingsworth.  He said "The quilt is made using all wool clothing purchased by my wife at thrift stores ... each item in the piece represents a way of life in a simple place and time."  The bright piece in the center is "Colores de Mexico" by Ellen Apte who says "The fabric photos are from a trip I took to Ajijic, Mexico.  It is embellished with Guatemalan worry dolls."

Some quilts had received ribbons.  Quilt no. 49 by Patsy Eckman is entitled "Reflection of Sunset on the Zambezi."  "This small quilt brings back memories of an evening boat trip on the Zambezi River in Zambia, Africa."   No. 50 by Nancy French is called "Gerry's Passion."  "This quilt commemorates our friend and guild member Gerry Largay, who was lost on the Appalachian Trail in July 2013."  It represents a sunset seen while backpacking to the top of Mt. LeConte in the Great Smoky Mountains in 2012."  (Gerry has not been found yet.)

Going back in the hall toward the dining room I passed more lovely quilts, such as the one at the top of my post, no. 29 "Bunch of Beauty" by Altan Altikulac, who was there and told me that the paisley yellow fabric in the center of her flower was decades old.  No. 85 "Hearts and Hands" by Penny Menefee took her ten years to complete.

A table topper on the dining room table was outstanding.  No. 17 by Diane Berdis is called "East is East."  If I ever quilted, this is what I would like to do - a small quilted table topper.

I feel that the period furniture in the historic home adds elegance and atmosphere to the handmade quilts.  The dazzling colors of the quilts give the old home an emotional aura full of warmth.  While in the dining room I took a picture toward the front parlor but then remembered that photos were not allowed inside the parlor and stopped.  I did visit the parlor and was in awe of the artistic quilts shown there.  Mrs. Karen Reese Tunnell was the Special Exhibit Artist featured this year and I am sorry I cannot show her work.  She specialized in hydro-printing (marbling) fabrics.  She has taught and practiced quilting and surface design for 40 years and teaches her art in two schools, one in Brasstown, NC and the other in Gatlinburg, TN.

In the Informal Hall I liked the quilt "Life is a Beach" by Karen Gornall.  It would look perfect in a teenager's bedroom.

In the Master Bedroom, the star quilt over the chimney was striking - no. 80 by Linda Wirtz called "25 Charmed Stars Salute."

There were other intricate quilts in this room, such as no. 77 "Your Petticoat is Showing" by Vanessa Howell Brown.  She used Civil War fabrics and added lace to the dress forms creating the petticoat that women wore before the turn of the century.  The colors of quilt no. 79 "A Quilt for Katherine" by Margaret Betz are very harmonious.

Four large quilts needed closer attention.


No. 78 "Erin's Wedding Quilt" by Beth Garrison Culp was covering the bed.  She says "I have worked on this quilt off and on for approximately 20 years."

Walking into the Library my eyes were drawn to both the Victorian settee and marble table.  No. 89 "Log cabin - Barn raising setting" by Holly Anderson is a foundation pieced 1/2 logs of silk.  This quilt was made circa 1900 by an unknown quilter.  Table topper No. 90 "Fall in the Great Smoky Mountains" by Pam Martin was made upon returning from the mountains.

Two guild members were present in the Library, one member was quilting and the other selling raffle tickets for a large blue and white quilt.

We returned to the main hall to continue our visit.  As we passed a couple of doors I took some quick photos with my cell phone of two wall hangings.  Quilt no. 7 "Tea Ceremony Geisha" is by Lisa Kaupp and is one of the few quilts for sale.

The other quilt, no. 20 "Dragonfly" is by Karne Gornall.  I thought that its striking design and colors would lend itself to my "waterlogue" watercolor treatment, which I did when I returned home.

More quilts to come in my next post ...


38 comments:

ELFI said...

beau travail.. belle expo..
les patchworks les plus sobres sont mes préférés ...

OldLady Of The Hills said...

I cannot get over the Beauty of all these quilts....I remember your posts from last year and they were all Beautiful Quilts, too, BUT....there is something about all of these that I find even MORE beautiful in every way---They are exquisite and so unusual in their subject matter and design.....They are simply Amazing Works Of Art!!! I liked so very many, I would be hard out to pick out just one!
Looking forward to more, my dear....!

Elephant's Child said...

There are some stunningly beautiful quilts there. Hours of fun to see, following hour after hour of dedicated work.
Thank you - I am looking forward to the next installment.

DJan said...

Wow! I couldn't possibly pick a favorite in these quilts, either, but the Geisha looks more like a painting than a quilt, it is so beautiful. Thank you for the wonderful quilts and I look forward to seeing more. :-)

Sandi McBride said...

I just shared your site with my sweet sister(inlaw) who is quite a talented quilter herself! I know she will appreciate these
hugs
Sandi

Frances said...

Vagabonde, I can see why you all would want to return to this year's quilt show. It is rather spectacular, with so many varying interpretations of "what is a quilt."

As you say, it's difficult to pick a favorite!

I look forward to the next quilt installment. xo

David said...

Vagabonde, That is a beautiful quilt display! My mother was a quilter and she made a couple for us. In addition, we have 8 - 10 antique quilts, with one dating back to around the Civil War. The problem is that they're so big and use so much wall space so they're hard to display. Our collection of paintings wins the space...along with 1 quilt, a hooked rug and a wall hanging. Take Care, Big Daddy Dave

Patricia said...

What a spectacular display of quilts, they are stunning. Where would you start to pick a favourite they are all so fabulous.

bayou said...

It must be overwhelming to see all these so different items and almost tiring for the eyes - how beautiful! Taking 20 years before completing one is really proof of perseverance. I wonder for which one you finally gave your vote.

Jennifer A. Jilks said...

They are amazing. My daughter made a quilt out of her hubby's t-shirts!
I was at a quilt presenation at our local LTC. The ladies loved it!

Thérèse said...

Wow!
I do remember your post from last year... that's when I decided to finish the one I have on progress. And guess what? It's not a joke I took it out one more time yesterday! Wish me luck this time.

Retired English Teacher said...

These quilts are amazing. I have been to quite a few quilt shows. I don't think I've ever seen anything like the geisha quilt before.

Arti said...

Yes I remember your previous Bulloch Hall posts. This exhibit is exquisite! These are beautiful handiwork, very folksy American. The house is one character mansion, historic and elegant. It's very apt to have this exhibition right in Bulloch Hall. Thanks for another wonderful post!

Flo de Sendai said...

Bonjour !
Ces quilts sont des merveilles !!!
Ca me donnerasit presque envie d'essayer, mais ca doit prendre beaucoup de temps...
(dommage que la "geisha" ait un kimono ferme du mauvais cote: c'est de mauvais augure,l'artiste aurait du se renseigner !)

Ton blog est tres interessant, Vagabonde !
A bientot,
Flo.

Magic Love Crow said...

I am in awwwww!! These are master pieces!! I can't wait to see more!

Geo. said...

What an astonishing display! So well photographed too.

Miss_Yves said...

Difficile de choisir, effectivement!
Mes préférés sont ceux dont les motifs géométriques tendent vers l'abstraction

Fundy Blue said...

Hi Vagabonde! What an inspiring post! I can see that you put a lot of thought, time, and effort into your blog! These quilts are amazing. My grandmother MacDonald and her mother were both avid quilters, and it is something I hope to take up in my retirement. Thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! Have a great week!

Linda said...

I love this large selection, and the vast themes and beautiful colours!

Jeanie said...

I have been looking forward to this post ever since your email saying you were going! Oh, I would hate to be a judge for this one. I could never pick a favorite. I would see one, say that was it and then another would pop up!

I especially admire quilting because I know I couldn't really do it. The tiny stitches to make the pieces, then putting it together. I know I'd get terribly impatient and my little arthritic (starting) fingers would wait. But oh -- how I love them.

I think you know I collect antique quilts. I love how these traditions have been carried forward and then embellished with new techniques, designs and fabrics. Four star!

sonia a. mascaro said...

Wow! Looks great the Quilt Show!
What a gorgeous and creative quilts. Love so much Linda Wirtz's quilt called "25 Charmed Stars Salute" and "Tea Ceremony Geisha" by Lisa Kaupp is also fantastic. All them are stunning! Thanks for sharing such beauty.

Carola Bartz said...

These are amazing quilts!!! What a treasure to see. I love the kimonos quilt and no. 50, plus the quilt with the big leaf (no. 56?). Gorgeous colors, and just plain lovely.

Jenny Woolf said...

Oh, my those quilts are so amazing, and wonderful. I could be happy in a quilt store selling them, because I'd never be short of something to look at and admire. They must have been quite an overwhelming experience in real life. One reason I love quilt shows. (even though they're not as good in England as in the US, i have to say. )

Vicki Lane said...

Such beautiful quilts! I think the Kimonos is my favorite.

Magali@TheLittleWhiteHouse said...

I'm just so amazed by what quilters can do.

Ginnie said...

I would have been "short of eyes," Vagabonde! OMG. You probably know that sister Ruth is quilting these days and is in bliss. She bought a new sewing machine to help her, since she can't do the hand-sewing anymore. I'm in great awe of this kind of art and could totally see myself making a quilt one day...if I ever took the time to do so. HA!

Sam Hoffer @ My Carolina Kitchen said...

The quilts are just amazing and I can imagine that it could take ten years to complete some of them. Thanks for taking us along.
Sam

Cergie said...

Tout cela est magnifique !
Il fut un temps où je faisais de la broderie puis du tricot puis de la broderie... Actuellement je tricote pour mes petits-enfants
Je n'ai jamais fait de patchwork, qui il me semble est un art pour "accommoder les restes". J'ai hérité de deux petits panneaux venant du Maroc et datant du début du 20ème siècle, l'un représentant un âne et son ânier. Un travail très sobre fait avec de la toile rayée notamment...

Mae Travels said...

Such an intriguing presentation of these works, which obviously require so much time and hard stitching! I like the views of the whole with some of the individual squares.

rhymeswithplague said...

This post is even more amazing than the ones describing your visit to the Bulloch Hall Quilt Show last year. Thank you for all the hard work and talent it must take to share your journeys with your readers. I am in awe.

claude said...

Quel admirable travail !
Ce sont des femmes au doigts de fée qui font tout ça.
Moi aussi je me souviens de ton post de l'année dernière. J'avais déjà été admirative.
Je t'enverrai par mail mes dernières créations.
J'espère que tu as bien reçu ma réponse à ton mail.
Bises

Dee said...

Dear Vagabonde, I took a deep sigh when I finished reading and viewing your blog and its photographs of a plethora of creative and beautiful quilts, each with its own history and background. So much time and thought and energy and love has gone into each of these quilts. They are like a history book of the human race. Peace.

Pat said...

These quilts are in a class of their own: beautiful works of art. They deserve to be treasured.

Cynthia said...

Wow, those are the most amazing quilts I have ever seen. I would love to see them, but thanks for sharing the photos. I can't even imagine how many hours they took to create.

Marie-Anne said...

Ils sont magnifiques tous ces quilts!!!!!!!!!! De vraies oeuvres d’art!!!!!
Merci de nous les avoir presentés! J’ai envoyé le link de ton post à une amie grecque/hollandaise qui fait des quilts. Je suis sûre qu’elle en sera ravie!!!
Bonnes bises de Grèce!
Marie-Anne

ღ ✽ ღ Nancy ღ ✽ ღ said...

C'est MAGNIFIQUE !

Merci pour ce superbe partage chère Vagabonde !!!

GROS BISOUS et bon dimanche !

This is Belgium said...

I LOOOOVE quilts and have a couple from the South here at home
treasure them
anni

Jono said...

Those are some of the most amazing and imaginative quilts I have ever seen!

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